Posts Tagged ‘Mt. Hood’

Northwest Birding Pictures From the Watsons

February 21, 2010

Joe and Betty Watson from Contra Costa County, CA, were on the February trip to the Northwest.  Here are some of the great images they captured.  As much poetry as a birding trip can stand.

Ferryboat taking a test run at dawn, Port Townsend.  Here we saw Pelagic Cormorant, Surfbirds, Black Turnstones, Pigeon Guillemots at close range, Red-necked Grebe, Surf Scoters, Northwest Crows, Glaucous-winged Gulls, harbor seals and two mule deer walking down the sidewalk.

A truly Northwestern experience, birding on a ferryboat.

You might call this next photo, “Birders Adrift.”  It was taken on Penn Cove, Whidbey Island.

AND THERE WERE ALSO SOME BIRDS

Three Eagles along the Nisqually River, in Nisqually NWR.

The locals refer to the genetic admixture of gullness as “Olympic Gull,” a large hybrid of many mixed generations of Glaucous-winged and Western.  Those specks offshore are scoters (Surf and White-winged), Common Goldeneyes,  Common Loons, Red-breasted Mergansers, Bufflehead, Greater Scaup, Horned Grebes and probably some Mew Gulls riding high in the water.  This was taken along Hood Canal at Dosewallips State Park.

Northwest Birding Gallery, February, 2010

February 13, 2010

One of the numerous Bald Eagles on Sauvie Island, west of Portland, Oregon.  The large number of wintering waterfowl attract the predatory eagles each year.  The competition is easily viewed as mature eagles like this one frequently swoop in and displace a younger eagle from its perch with a clear view of the lakes and marshes.  Geese and ducks are spooked into swirling flocks aflight whenever an eagle soars over their location.  Harriers can also raise a cloud of birds. The potential prey does not act the same way when a Red-tailed Hawk is seen.

Below:   Peregrine overlooking marsh on the  west end of Sauvie Island.

Top to bottom:  Looking east across the flats of Sauvie Island.

Dawn at Astoria near the mouth of the Columbia River.

Eagle pair overlooking Columbia from perch in Warrenton, Oregon.  After they left this lone young eagle took the same perch, well known, apparently, among local eagles.

Two Surfbirds on the boulder beach at Seaside, Oregon.  As usual, they were mixed in with a flock of Black Turnstones.  Offshore were White-winged Scoters.  On the right: single Surfbird and starfish on rocks.

Sauvie Island revisited

February 6, 2010

I brought a second group of PIBirding clients to Sauvie Island today.  Despite the forecast of rain we endured hours of sunshine after a couple rainbows.  Over sixty species.

One of the last birds we saw today:

This Peregrine al0ng Rentenaar Road. Of course there were plenty of BIG raptors:

Location:  Sauvie’s Island
Observation date:     2/5/10
Number of species:     62

Greater White-fronted Goose     2
Snow Goose     800
Ross’s Goose     15
Cackling Goose     120
Canada Goose     2500
Canada Goose (Dusky)     400
Tundra Swan     250
Eurasian Wigeon     4
American Wigeon     800
Mallard     200
Northern Shoveler     120
Northern Pintail     750
Green-winged Teal     250
Ring-necked Duck     150
Lesser Scaup     15
Bufflehead     2
Hooded Merganser     3
Pied-billed Grebe     3
Double-crested Cormorant     35
Great Blue Heron     6
Great Egret     4
Bald Eagle     16
Northern Harrier     10
Red-tailed Hawk     25
American Kestrel     12
Peregrine Falcon     1
American Coot     160
Sandhill Crane     300
Dunlin     40
Mew Gull     30
Ring-billed Gull     350
California Gull     1
Rock Pigeon     15
Eurasian Collared-Dove     5
Mourning Dove     30
Great Horned Owl     1
Red-breasted Sapsucker     3
Downy Woodpecker     2
Hairy Woodpecker     1
Northern Flicker (Red-shafted)     12
Steller’s Jay     4
Western Scrub-Jay     16
American Crow     30
Black-capped Chickadee     8
Brown Creeper     3
Bewick’s Wren     2
Golden-crowned Kinglet     1
American Robin     15
European Starling     250
Yellow-rumped Warbler     6
Spotted Towhee     4
Fox Sparrow     1
Song Sparrow     10
White-crowned Sparrow     8
Golden-crowned Sparrow     50
Dark-eyed Junco (Oregon)     24
Red-winged Blackbird     20
Western Meadowlark     4
Brewer’s Blackbird     50
House Finch     6
Pine Siskin     2
American Goldfinch     2